Why full physical and legal custody is important for individuals in Southeastern, PA

There are times in which serious problems occur within a marriage or a relationship that requires a parent to take action to protect their child. In situations where there is drug use, abuse, or neglect, one parent may leave the other with the child as a way to protect them. In these situations, individuals will want to consult an attorney in Norristown, PA to file appropriate paperwork through the court which allows the child to be legally removed from the home and in the care of the other parent to remove the child from harm’s way. These are considered protection orders (protection from abuse) and may be temporary or near permanent.

When there is a parent who is doing what is best for their child to protect them, they need to work with an attorney who can get them both primary physical and legal custody of the child. In some cases, protection orders may also be placed and can eliminate visitation when there is proof of abuse from the other parent towards the child or the other parent. Attorney Jack A. Rounick has worked with many men and women who have left abusive relationships and needed to obtain the proper custody orders to keep their child from being in contact with a parent who is abusive, uses drugs, or is neglectful of a small child while in their care.

Primary physical custody means that the child lives with one parent most of the time and in cases of abuse the other parent may not have any custody or merely supervised visitation. In a typical separation or divorce, the child would see the other parent during custody time, also referred to as “parenting time.” However, in cases of abuse, drugs, or neglect, this time is often eliminated or supervised for the safety of the child. Legal custody is an indication of who can make educational, religious, and medical decisions for the child. Another parent who is not active in the child’s life, or one who is considered a parent incapable of coming into an agreement with the other parent on other concerns, may not be given any legal rights. This varies from case to case but can be discussed with an attorney.